So you want to be a leader? Be an evangelist/enthusiast!


Develop the habit of being all about what you stand for, what others can believe in. The bad habit is to be the critic who has become cynical – and can only be evaluated by all the things you are against, dislike or believe worthless.

I would need a sociologist or behavioural physiologist to fully explain the phenomena – but closely related to “Bad News Sells” is the fact that crowds, groups, choose to pay attention to the cynic, the knocker over the evangelist, enthusiast. However, don’t be fooled by that attention – who and what they follow is rich, wholesome and creative when it is the evangelist, enthusiast.

We only need tune into twitter or the TV to find a deluge of folks purporting to lead but with nothing other than bile and negative intent for us to consume because it can be

  • entertaining in small doses,
  • readily available,
  • no doubt cheap
  • a quick road to ‘fame’ if you are shallow enough to buy it.

However, we also find hidden gems, little nuggets of the human spirit making a different choice, to stand up and be counted as being for something we can build or create together – how refreshing and energising is that?!

I talk of this in terms of habits and it is important to think of it thematically that way, since it’s easy to fall into this bad habit everyday, in every meeting or communication. There are tips and tricks, and I’m as sceptical as anyone when they stray toward the politically correct, such as ‘find and replace’ problem with opportunity for example – but that is not what I am talking about here. What I am talking about is an authentic belief in something or someplace that you describe again and again and again.

Good would be things you are going to create, transform, build or become. Bad would be things you would beat, destroy, marginalise.

bottom line – The cynic drags crowds to the bottom – The leader draws followers to the top

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You’re too nice – and that’s a problem


Develop a habit of shooting projects and ideas in the head not in the foot.

It is not my job to be nice – it is my job to make good, clear decisions that further the interests of the business – yet so often I can be tempted with laziness and fear of failure dressed up as compassion or fair play or worst of all incubation innovation. When I do this, I shot something in the foot since I was unprepared to invest resource as a priority when really, I should have shot it in the head.

If I am not going to commit to the success (and I mean commit resources) of a project, make certain that no-one else is either. That means targeting the wounded, unsupported projects that limp about the campus dragging their bloody stumps of project plans and milestones with them – and terminating them.

There have been mammoth Darwinian contests between equal teams that result in spectacular innovation and rate of progress, and I am not talking about those since their success involves at some point the ingestion of the rival or it’s natural demise – no, I’m talking about the hubris programs, the vanity projects that simply should not be drawing a single bean of resource from shareholders and staff alike.

My job is to be rigorous, apply the rules fairly and consistently and develop a habit of killing off stone dead an idea or plan whose time has not come or that I cannot provide adequate resources for given my current priority.

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